The intends of the journal room to communicate and also to record the results of new research in the atmospheric sciences and associated fields. The Quarterly Journal is recognized as among the world’s top meteorological publications. Contributions might take the type of Articles, comprehensive review articles, or comment on released papers. The journal is released eight times a year with additional special issues.

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Quantifying the circulation induced by convective clouds in kilometer-scale simulations

Annika Oertel & Sebastian Schemm

The complicated coupling between the large-scale atmospheric circulation, which is explicitly resolved in modern-day numerical weather and climate models, and cloud-related diabatic processes, which space parameterized, is crucial source the error in weather predictions and climate projections. Come quantify the interactions between clouds and also the large-scale circulation, a method is to work that attributes a far- and near-field circulation to the cloud system.


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Barotropic development of Monsoon Depressions

Michael Diaz & wilhelm R. Boos

Although monsoon depressions space a primary synoptic-scale element of the South eastern Monsoon, producing extreme rainfall over India and also surrounding regions, there exists no widely embraced mechanism explaining their occurence. This examine presents a hierachy of number experiments aimed at finding such an explanation.


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Seasonal variability that shallow cumuliform snowfall: A CloudSat perspective

Mark S. Kulie & Lisa Milani. Southern Hemisphere seasonal results show a solid mean cumuliform snowfall rate maximum (minimum) in JJA (DJF) attach by a seasonal latitudinal change in the snowfall rate peak. Maximum regional snowfall rates exceed 300 mm/year over a broader area contrasted to the north Hemisphere. Cumuliform snowfall manufacturing is strongly connected to seasonal sea ice cream coverage.


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Classification of precipitating clouds utilizing satellite infrared observations and also its effects for rainfall estimation

Damwon for this reason & Dong‐Bin Shin This examine classifies precipitating clouds into five cloud groups. The category uses 3 brightness temperature differences (BTDs) and one BTD difference (ΔBTD) indigenous Himawari‐8 advanced Himawari Imager (AHI): BTD1 (6.2–11.2 µm), BTD2 (8.6–11.2 µm), BTD3 (11.2–12.4 µm), and ΔBTD (BTD2 − BTD3). BTD1 is discovered to be efficient for separating shallow and non‐shallow clouds in recommendation to the worldwide Precipitation measure Dual‐frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) level 2 data. When this separation is complete, non‐shallow clouds are additional classified. The an adverse and optimistic values that ΔBTD generally indicate an ext water and more ice in clouds, respectively, distinguishing non‐shallow clouds with tall and taller cloud heights.

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An observationally based method for stratifying a priori passive microwave monitorings in a Bayesian‐based precipitation retrieval framework

F. Joseph Turk et. Al. Estimation of precipitation native space‐based passive microwave (PMW) radiometric brightness temperature (TB) observations that adapts to the wide range of planet surface background and environmental conditions is a long‐standing issue. Due to the fact that these conditions are typically unknown indigenous the TB observations, PMW‐based precipitation estimation techniques generally utilize elevation ancillary data sources, such as interpolated prognostic variables from numerical weather prediction projection models, and discrete surface emissivity classifications.